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6zm

Aug 30 '14
Aug 20 '14

What happened to Ishkur’s Guide??

Aug 14 '14
Jul 1 '14
Jun 27 '14
Jun 22 '14
6zm - Blurred EP

Blurred EP is out now!

Jun 20 '14
Tomorrow is the release day!

Tomorrow is the release day!

Jun 20 '14

hyponitix

(Source: youtube.com)

Jun 6 '14
dreamtime, the aboriginal cosmology
nocornea: Dreamtime by Julian Santiago 

dreamtime, the aboriginal cosmology

nocorneaDreamtime by Julian Santiago 

Jun 4 '14

vanished:

Roman Opałka - The Finite Defined by the Nonfinite

The late French-born Polish artist Roman Opałka was a man of numbers. Best known for his numerical paintings known as The Finite Defined by the Nonfinite, Opałka began his famed work by hand-painting a consecutive series of integers, starting with “1” on the uppermost left-hand corner of the canvas, in 1965. He proceeded to produce canvases filled with the progression of numbers continuously following the previous batch.

Interestingly, the artist chose to start his lifelong creative path by painting in white against a black background and, since 1972, progressively lightened the background by making each successive piece 1% whiter so that, he said, “the moment will arrive when I will paint white on white.” That moment finally came along in 2008, at which point he continued to paint his camouflaging digits he referred to as “blanc mérité” (translated as “white well earned”). To add to the project, the artist even included a voice recording of himself reading every number aloud, to accompany each painting.

What’s most remarkable about Opałka’s works, besides their neat alignment without the assistance of a ruler, is their ability to track time. There’s never the question of which painting came before another because they are already organized accordingly. They are, essentially, dated in more ways than one — the numerical sequence, the artist’s voice, and the shade of the background. The artist’s paintings are like his own coded journals, marking and recording different times in his life. Opałka’s final number painted was 5,607,249.

May 31 '14
kidmograph:

STTS

kidmograph:

STTS

May 29 '14
May 22 '14
fouriestseries:

Chaos and the Double Pendulum
A chaotic system is one in which infinitesimal differences in the starting conditions lead to drastically different results as the system evolves.
Summarized by mathematician Edward Lorenz, ”Chaos [is] when the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future.”
There’s an important distinction to make between a chaotic system and a random system. Given the starting conditions, a chaotic system is entirely deterministic. A random system, on the other hand, is entirely non-deterministic, even when the starting conditions are known. That is, with enough information, the evolution of a chaotic system is entirely predictable, but in a random system there’s no amount of information that would be enough to predict the system’s evolution.
The simulations above show two slightly different initial conditions for a double pendulum — an example of a chaotic system. In the left animation both pendulums begin horizontally, and in the right animation the red pendulum begins horizontally and the blue is rotated by 0.1 radians (≈ 5.73°) above the positive x-axis. In both simulations, all of the pendulums begin from rest.
Mathematica code posted here.
[For more information on how to solve for the motion of a double pendulum, check out my video here.]

fouriestseries:

Chaos and the Double Pendulum

chaotic system is one in which infinitesimal differences in the starting conditions lead to drastically different results as the system evolves.

Summarized by mathematician Edward Lorenz, ”Chaos [is] when the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future.”

There’s an important distinction to make between a chaotic system and a random system. Given the starting conditions, a chaotic system is entirely deterministic. A random system, on the other hand, is entirely non-deterministic, even when the starting conditions are known. That is, with enough information, the evolution of a chaotic system is entirely predictable, but in a random system there’s no amount of information that would be enough to predict the system’s evolution.

The simulations above show two slightly different initial conditions for a double pendulum — an example of a chaotic system. In the left animation both pendulums begin horizontally, and in the right animation the red pendulum begins horizontally and the blue is rotated by 0.1 radians (≈ 5.73°) above the positive x-axis. In both simulations, all of the pendulums begin from rest.

Mathematica code posted here.

[For more information on how to solve for the motion of a double pendulum, check out my video here.]

May 21 '14
a picture from our ongoing interactive project ”hybridity”

a picture from our ongoing interactive project ”hybridity”

May 20 '14

p5art:

Impressionist filter, based on a noiseMap

(I tried to recreate the filter described in this article; source image from Martin Schoeller; my code here - my handling of the brushSize is not great though … suggestions as to how to do it better are welcome) 

41 notes (via p5art)